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Posted by on Oct 30, 2015 | 1 comment

Haunted Del Ray

Haunted Del Ray

From demonic rats to creepy clowns, graveyards and spiderwebs and skeletons galore, Del Ray takes its Halloween decorating seriously. You can’t go down one block without spotting an homage to this horrific season. Here’s a few of the scenes from around our spooky hood. HAPPY...

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Posted by on Oct 14, 2015 | 1 comment

Favorite Stories to Share at Halloween for Tots Through Tweens

Favorite Stories to Share at Halloween for Tots Through Tweens

Listen to the wind picking up, snuggle under a blanket, and enjoy sharing these alternately funny and spooky stories about witches, ghosts, monsters, and jack ‘o lanterns. Many of these don’t specifically reference Halloween, which makes them all the better for pulling out all year round when the mood strikes. Here are my pics for spooky books from youngest to oldest ages. Pete the Cat: Five Little Pumpkins By James Dean (Ages 2-4) I’ll forever have a soft spot in my heart for the “Five Little Pumpkins” poem, which my son used to recite to us when he was a preschooler. I only wish this book had been published back then! Ten Orange Pumpkins By Stephen Savage (Ages 2-6) In this delightfully dark Halloween-themed countdown, the reader must look closely to discover the mystery behind how each pumpkin disappears. You can read my full review here. Happy Halloween, Witch’s Cat! By Harriet Muncaster (Ages 2-6) The charming dress-up enthusiast from last year’s I am a Witch’s Cat is back...

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Posted by on Nov 14, 2014 | 0 comments

DIY Kids: Making New Treats with Halloween Candy

DIY Kids: Making New Treats with Halloween Candy

My kids would never admit to having “leftover” candy – each piece is precious to them. But, without question, we do have an abundance and I love the idea of turning some of the candy into new treats like this chocolate candy bark. I must admit that it took some convincing to get my kids to turn over some of their stash for this project. But, they finally agreed to take part after agonizing over the 5-8 pieces they’d each contribute. Following a recipe on bon appétit, I got Nadja started on cutting up the candy into small chunks. Out of the corner of my eye, I saw her surreptitiously tasting the crumbs, but in the end, she did very well with sticking to the task. As an experiment, we decided to devote one section of the candy bark to smashed-up pretzels and potato chips. Next, we unwrapped bars of bittersweet chocolate, 1 pounds worth in all… And the girls broke the pieces up into a sauce pan to...

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Posted by on Oct 31, 2014 | 1 comment

DIY Athena Costume: The Reveal

DIY Athena Costume: The Reveal

We’ve led up to this moment with two prior posts on the construction of this exquisite warrior Athena costume. Part 1 showed Helena’s mother Amanda constructing the helmet. In Part 2, we showed the crocheted aegis (or cape), as well as the other important accessories she made by hand like the tunic, breastplate, gauntlets, and leg guards, and sword. In this post, the photos tell the story of Amanda helping Helena transform into her favorite Greek goddess, a proud moment for both Mother and daughter. Awesome work...

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Posted by on Oct 21, 2014 | 3 comments

DIY Athena Costume Part 2: The Aegis

DIY Athena Costume Part 2: The Aegis

In part 1, we took a look at Amanda’s meticulous handiwork in constructing a helmet for her 7-year-old daughter Helena’s chosen Halloween costume — the warrior goddess Athena — based on the imagery in the Olympian series of graphic novels. For the remainder of the costume, Amanda deliberately chose to diverge from George O’Connor’s vision of Athena in the comic. “His art is incredible, stunning stuff,” she says. “However, what works in a two-dimensional format to suggest athletic movement, the rippling and snap of a cape (or aegis) mid-leap, would just look limp in person.” She goes on to explain that the origin of the aegis in the comic is that it is an item of power owned by Zeus. He gifts it to his favorite daughter. After Athena kills Pallas the giant, she incorporates his flayed skin (which can’t be pierced by swords) into her aegis. Later, when Perseus brings the head of Medusa (a former priestess of Athena) to her, she incorporates that as well. It’s portrayed...

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