Pages Menu
TwitterFacebook
Categories Menu

Posted by on Oct 11, 2012 | 0 comments

The Making of a Low Country Boil

The Making of a Low Country Boil

I attended my first low country boil (LCB) over the weekend. Not sure how I’ve lived to this point without doing this, but I guess there are a lot of things I have yet to try. Fortunately my friends have grown accustomed to me whipping out my camera at any given moment and let me document the process.

First, you need a large pot and a heat source. We used a turkey fryer with a built-in strainer and a propane tank. We needed enough food for 6-8 adults, so the turkey fryer was just the right size.

boil3

The great thing about the boil is that you can do your prep work hours in advance and keep everything stored in bags and containers until showtime.

low country boil

low country boil

The potatoes and the spice mix didn’t need any prep.

boil1

You can put whatever you want in the pot — typically a mixture of vegetables, sausages and seafood. Here’s the recipe we followed. As you can see by the condition of the paper and numerous recipe modifications, its been around the family for a while, tested and tweaked throughout the years. (Click the photo for a larger version.)

low country boil

Once the water has reached a boil, you’ll add the ingredients in phases, depending on how long each takes to cook (the recipe above will tell you when). Tip: Use a timer to keep track of the steps and make sure the water is always boiling. The vegetables go first.

low country boil

low country boil

low country boil

In all, the process takes about 45 minutes. While the pot boiled, we started off with some snacks — a rustic tart with artichokes, radishes, and shallots…

rustic tart

As well as a tomato mozzarella salad from a backyard garden that just keeps going and going.

tomato basil mozzerella salad

If you have room outside, the LCB is perfect for enjoying on your patio (best for fall because on warm summer days, the flies will surely go wild). We wrapped the patio table with paper to prepare for what would come.

low country boil

low country boil

low country boil

low country boil

low country boil

Oh mama, time to feast! No plates or forks necessary. Napkins are strongly recommended.

low country boil

low country boil

What do you drink with a low country boil? Beer! We washed down our meal with some home brews brought by another guest. He made the labels too, a tribute to his son and his pacific northwest heritage.

home-brewed beer

All six of us couldn’t possibly eat it all.

low country boil

The remains of shrimp, clams and corn sat in piles.

low country boil

Clean-up was a breeze — we just wrapped everything up in the paper and stuffed in a trash bag.

low country boil clean-up

And of course all autumnal parties should end with a bonfire.

fire pit

Low country boil is the ultimate make-ahead/impress-your-friends party food. Never tried it at home? Tis the season.

Leave a Reply